// Load google fonts from directory IMPRINT - Immigrant Professional Integration - IMPRINT: Immigrant Professional Integration
  • Great English classes could bring a high-skilled immigrant from dishwasher back to doctor, and bring his bilingual-bicultural skills to patients who need them.
    Great English classes could bring a high-skilled immigrant from dishwasher back to doctor, and bring his bilingual-bicultural skills to patients who need them.
    College-educated immigrants with low English skills are twice as likely to be underemployed - Migration Policy Institute
  • New Americans are closing employers' high-skill gaps and keeping cities vibrant.
    New Americans are closing employers' high-skill gaps and keeping cities vibrant.
    Nearly half of the nations largest metro areas attract 25% more college-educated immigrants than immigrants without a high school diploma - The Brookings Institution
  • A skilled immigrant can provide a better future for her children and the economy. Success shouldn't have to skip a generation!
    A skilled immigrant can provide a better future for her children and the economy. Success shouldn't have to skip a generation!
    Almost 17 million children live in immigrant families. Successful, integrated immigrant parents raise children with greater academic achievement and psychological and physical well-being. - Peabody Journal of Education, Future of Children, Russell Sage Foundation
  • A New American entering into a higher-skilled job pays more taxes; her old job can then be filled by a person with the right skill-set.
    A New American entering into a higher-skilled job pays more taxes; her old job can then be filled by a person with the right skill-set.
    If just 5% of the 2.7 million underutilized immigrant professionals could find $35,000 a year jobs, it would generate $6 billion in taxes over a 5-year period.
  • A civil engineer parking cars for a living? The careers of skilled immigrants can stall without the right orientation to the U.S. professional job search.
    A civil engineer parking cars for a living? The careers of skilled immigrants can stall without the right orientation to the U.S. professional job search.
    22% of immigrants with at least a Bachelor's degree are employed in low-skilled jobs; another 20% work in jobs that require only an Associates degree. - Migration Policy Institute

Latest News

IMPRINT's Survey of College-Educated Immigrants is now OPEN (11/11/2014) New!

We would truly appreciate your help in sharing the survey links far and wide. We are looking forward for a broad response from immigrants of every background - new arrivals and longtime residents, working professionals and those in "survival jobs", men and women of every racial and ethnic background. Simply forward this survey link to your immigrant network or learn more about this research project here. 

Big News: Knight Foundation Funds Study of Immigrant Talent in 6 Cities (10/02/2014) 

IMPRINT's home organization, World Education Services, has just received a grant to conduct an immigrant talent study that will help 6 cities leverage local talent to contribute to economic development. Find out more in our official press release and see what Paul Feltman, chair of IMPRINT had to say about this new talent study.

New Publication on the Latest Numbers of College-Educated Immigrants (09/10/2014) 

This new 2-pager features selected content from a 60-minute webinar on college-educated immigrants, their education, and employment characteristics. It also takes an in-depth look at immigrant STEM graduates. Missed this webinar? The recording is also available!

A Note from Stacey, IMPRINT's New Director (09/08/2014) 

Read Stacey's note on advancing the field through increased collaboration. 

IMPRINT Announces New Organizational Home & New Director (08/19/2014) 

IMPRINT will now be housed at WES Global Talent Bridge in New York City. Our new director is Stacey K. Simon. Read our announcement. 

Welcome!

immigrant professional woman doctor



The United States continues to be a beacon attracting immigrants from around the world. Many of these are highly educated with in-demand skills.

They come by a variety of means, including marriage to US citizens, winning the Diversity Visa lottery, direct investment, or being granted refugee or asylee status. Such New Americans are work authorized and here to stay.

Yet for a surprising number, their American Dream is deferred by multiple challenges to rebuilding their careers in the US. The taxi driver who was a scientist “back home;” the nanny earning poverty-level wages while her international nursing degree collects dust on her dresser.

Most of the challenges to re-entering the professional workforce can be overcome, as the member organizations of IMPRINT have proven in our more than 40 years of collective experience. This consortium represents practitioners leading the US in the new field of high skilled immigrant workforce integration.

We connect this untapped talent pool with resources and employers for the benefit of all.

We hope you will learn more about these issues by exploring the site. Lend your voice to ours as we reach out to government, business and other practitioners with our proven, innovative models. And please join our mailing list for updates!
Thank you!

– The IMPRINT Team

 

immigrant professional surveyor man-1 

Imagine a doctor working as a dishwasher, or an engineer driving a taxicab. Unfortunately, these people aren’t imaginary – they represent the more than 2.7 million immigrant professionals across the US who are unemployed or work in jobs far below their capacity.

Their under-employment has high costs for their families and communities. When these talented workers are unable to apply their international education and training to work in the United States, they face low wages, while the broader community suffers a tremendous waste of human capital.

Read more...

bicultural immigrant professional woman-2 IMPRINT is a coalition of organizations active in the emerging field of immigrant professional integration.

IMPRINT works closely with business, government, higher education and other partners to raise awareness about the talents and contributions of immigrant professionals.

In particular, IMPRINT works to streamline complex professional licensing and re-credentialing processes, and advocate for the adoption of policies and best practices that facilitate the rapid integration of these skilled workers.

Mission:

To identify and promote best practices in the integration of immigrant professionals. IMPRINT supports national, state and local efforts to incorporate multilingual/multicultural talent, and to create and implement policies and best practices that support the successful integration of skilled immigrants into the US economy. Through its member organizations, IMPRINT also supports the direct provision of career and re-credentialing services to workers.

Vision:

IMPRINT envisions a United States which actively welcomes internationally educated skilled workers, and recognizes these talented individuals as vital colleagues, neighbors and fellow citizens.

 

IMPRINT members draw on specialized knowledge to guide work-authorized immigrants in applying their international postsecondary education and professional experience to careers in the US. Member organizations include practitioners, educators, researchers, and policy professionals.

IMPRINT members provide a wide range of services to immigrant professionals, including:

  • Credential evaluation
  • Soft-skills and specialized technical training
  • Educational advising
  • English language instruction
  • Professional acculturation
  • Employment placement
  • Networking skills
Read more...

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